Virtual Library

Our virtual library is an online repository of all of the reports, papers, and briefings that IST has produced, as well as works that have influenced our thinking.

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Reports

Unlocking U.S. Technological Competitiveness: Proposing Solutions to Public-Private Misalignments

Ben Purser, Pavneet Singh

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Articles

The Phone-a-Friend Option: Use Cases for a U.S.-U.K.-French Crisis Communication Channel

Daniil Zhukov

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Articles

China: Nuclear Crisis Communications and Risk Reduction

Dr. Tong Zhao

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Articles

Use-Cases of Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: A View from Russia

Dmitry Stefanovich

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Articles

Pakistan: Mitigating Nuclear Risks Through Crisis Communications

Dr. Rabia Akhtar

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Articles

Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: India’s Experience

Dr. Manpreet Sethi

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Reports

A Lifecycle Approach to AI Risk Reduction: Tackling the Risk of Malicious Use Amid Implications of Openness

Louie Kangeter

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We also welcome additional suggestions from readers, and will consider adding further resources as so much of our work has come through crowd-sourced collaboration already. If, for any chance you are an author whose work is listed here and you do not wish it to be listed in our repository, please, let us know.

SUBMIT CONTENT

Command and Control of Nuclear Weapons in India

M.V. Ramana, Lauren J. Borja

SUMMARY

Indian strategists and policy makers have been grappling with the challenges of setting up a system for the command and control of nuclear weapons since the 1960s. Due to the extremely opaque public record regarding nuclear matters more broadly, it remains “hard to put together a comprehensive account of nuclear command and control in India.” In this essay, however, M.V. Ramana and Lauren Borja attempt to lay out what is known, concluding that Indian “nuclear weapons are said to be controlled by the Nuclear Command Authority, a two layered structure, one of which is headed by the Prime Minister. Nuclear command and control in India,” they conclude, “has been shaped by an ongoing rivalry between civilian authorities and the military.” In the tense South Asian nuclear standoff, with disagreement in the public sphere regarding even policies such as no nuclear first use, India’s approach to NC3 remains a critical issue set.

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