Virtual Library

Our research repositories present a collection of open-source resources that showcase research and analysis that has directly influenced our initiatives. Non-IST publications are copyrighted by external authors not affiliated with IST.

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Op-ed

The Nuclear Risk Reduction Approach: A Useful Path Forward for Crisis Mitigation

Sylvia Mishra

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Reports

Nuclear Crisis Communications: Mapping Risk Reduction Implementation Pathways

Sylvia Mishra

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Reports

Towards a Stronger Ukrainian Media Ecosystem

Leah Walker, Alexa Wehsener, Natalia Antonova

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Op-ed

Pentagon’s Office of Strategic Capital must win over Silicon Valley

Leah Walker and Alexa Wehsener

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Fact Sheet

DOD Establishes the Office of Strategic Capital

Strategic Balancing Initiative

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Video

Cyber Resilience and Insurance Innovation

Blueprint for Ransomware Defense Webinar Series | Monica Shokrai, Davis Hake, Prashant Pai, and John Banghart

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Reports

To the Point of Failure: Identifying Failure Points for Crisis Communications Systems

Leah Walker, Alexa Wehsener

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We also welcome additional suggestions from readers, and will consider adding further resources as so much of our work has come through crowd-sourced collaboration already. If, for any chance you are an author whose work is listed here and you do not wish it to be listed in our repository, please, let us know.

SUBMIT CONTENT

Towards a Stronger Ukrainian Media Ecosystem

Leah Walker, Alexa Wehsener, Natalia Antonova

SUMMARY

In 2021, the Institute for Security and Technology began supporting the U.S. Embassy, Kyiv to develop strategies to combat Russian disinformation and improve the digital safety of Ukrainian civil society and media. Just as our work with Embassy-Kyiv got underway, Russia launched its invasion, and the nature of the project shifted from preparation to response. This report captures that response.

Key Findings:

  1. Russian disinformation efforts during the Russo-Ukrainian War spanned a variety of narratives, an approach that muddied the water and allowed for the dissemination of different narratives that could appeal to different audiences.
  2. The disinformation narratives evolved during the lead up to and first two weeks of the war, as new items, such as Zelensky’s speech at the Munich Security Conference, broke through and provided new avenues for attracting attention.
  3. The Ukrainian media ecosystem demonstrated admirable resilience in the face of disinformation, and has many opportunities to further boost its resilience to future challenges.
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