Virtual Library

Our virtual library is an online repository of all of the reports, papers, and briefings that IST has produced, as well as works that have influenced our thinking.

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Reports

Unlocking U.S. Technological Competitiveness: Proposing Solutions to Public-Private Misalignments

Ben Purser, Pavneet Singh

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Articles

The Phone-a-Friend Option: Use Cases for a U.S.-U.K.-French Crisis Communication Channel

Daniil Zhukov

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Articles

China: Nuclear Crisis Communications and Risk Reduction

Dr. Tong Zhao

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Articles

Use-Cases of Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: A View from Russia

Dmitry Stefanovich

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Articles

Pakistan: Mitigating Nuclear Risks Through Crisis Communications

Dr. Rabia Akhtar

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Articles

Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: India’s Experience

Dr. Manpreet Sethi

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Reports

A Lifecycle Approach to AI Risk Reduction: Tackling the Risk of Malicious Use Amid Implications of Openness

Louie Kangeter

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We also welcome additional suggestions from readers, and will consider adding further resources as so much of our work has come through crowd-sourced collaboration already. If, for any chance you are an author whose work is listed here and you do not wish it to be listed in our repository, please, let us know.

SUBMIT CONTENT

Towards a Stronger Ukrainian Media Ecosystem

Leah Walker, Alexa Wehsener, Natalia Antonova

SUMMARY

In 2021, the Institute for Security and Technology began supporting the U.S. Embassy, Kyiv to develop strategies to combat Russian disinformation and improve the digital safety of Ukrainian civil society and media. Just as our work with Embassy-Kyiv got underway, Russia launched its invasion, and the nature of the project shifted from preparation to response. This report captures that response.

Key Findings:

  1. Russian disinformation efforts during the Russo-Ukrainian War spanned a variety of narratives, an approach that muddied the water and allowed for the dissemination of different narratives that could appeal to different audiences.
  2. The disinformation narratives evolved during the lead up to and first two weeks of the war, as new items, such as Zelensky’s speech at the Munich Security Conference, broke through and provided new avenues for attracting attention.
  3. The Ukrainian media ecosystem demonstrated admirable resilience in the face of disinformation, and has many opportunities to further boost its resilience to future challenges.
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