Virtual Library

Our virtual library is an online repository of all of the reports, papers, and briefings that IST has produced, as well as works that have influenced our thinking.

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Reports

Unlocking U.S. Technological Competitiveness: Proposing Solutions to Public-Private Misalignments

Ben Purser, Pavneet Singh

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Articles

The Phone-a-Friend Option: Use Cases for a U.S.-U.K.-French Crisis Communication Channel

Daniil Zhukov

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Articles

China: Nuclear Crisis Communications and Risk Reduction

Dr. Tong Zhao

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Articles

Use-Cases of Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: A View from Russia

Dmitry Stefanovich

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Articles

Pakistan: Mitigating Nuclear Risks Through Crisis Communications

Dr. Rabia Akhtar

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Articles

Resilient Nuclear Crisis Communications: India’s Experience

Dr. Manpreet Sethi

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Reports

A Lifecycle Approach to AI Risk Reduction: Tackling the Risk of Malicious Use Amid Implications of Openness

Louie Kangeter

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We also welcome additional suggestions from readers, and will consider adding further resources as so much of our work has come through crowd-sourced collaboration already. If, for any chance you are an author whose work is listed here and you do not wish it to be listed in our repository, please, let us know.

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Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications: U.S. Country Profile

Jeffrey Larsen

SUMMARY

For the past 75 years, Jeffrey Larsen argues that the deterrence forces of the United States have relied on the credible threat of nuclear weapons use to prevent adversarial attacks. As part of his explanation, a vital piece of the U.S. deterrence mission is ensuring NC3 provides the links between nuclear forces and presidential authority under all conditions. U.S. NC3 systems today face multiple challenges after more than two decades of neglect of its nuclear forces and NC3 infrastructure.

In this essay, Jeffrey Larsen reviews the legacy NC3 system of the United States now in the midst of a sea-change. He concludes: “The need to ensure robust existing capabilities for the current system, plus the desire to create a new system that is more than a simple modernization of existing capabilities, in a world facing more diverse threats, all while harnessing the value-added of new technologies, means that the NC3 system twenty years hence may bear little resemblance to its current arrangement.”

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